• " La lecture du Bouc émissaire est d'un enchantement drolatique et désespéré. " Le Nouvel Obs
    Quand l'Étranger arriva, Askanius fut son bon génie : il lui prêta la somme pour ouvrir son cabinet d'avocat. Une fois installé, Édouard Libotz voulut se faire des amis, se marier, " faire sa vie ". " Il fit le bien et résista au mal parce qu'il ne pouvait faire autrement : la vertu était son destin. "

    Mais Libotz ne réussit pas à sauver son ami Askanius du désastre déclenché par le procureur –; symbole du mal absolu –;, pas plus qu'il ne parvient à se faire accepter dans la province. Il part, il " supporte les coups du destin, l'un après l'autre, sans laisser s'éteindre son espoir tout ensanglanté ".

    " Libotz est un homme ordinaire, mais il est entouré d'une aura qui fait penser à ces jeunes gens dostoïevskiens, pareils à des saints. Nul ne semble s'être rendu compte, lorsque parut
    Le Bouc Émissaire en 1907, qu'on avait là l'un des plus grands récits écrits dans la langue suédoise. Il n'a pas été surpassé par la suite, ni même égalé. " (Sven Stolpe, biographe de Strindberg.)

  • L'orage menace d'éclater pendant qu'un vieil homme solitaire agite son passé, menaçant ainsi son repos.

  • " On a affaire à une toile de maître de petit format, à un morceau de musique de chambre dont les échos resteront longtemps dans l'esprit des lecteurs. " Le Point

    " Après la mort de la mère – elle aurait été assassinée –, personne ne fit plus la cuisine ; les frères partirent, et Alrik resta seul avec son père qui n'ouvrait plus la bouche. C'est à cette époque qu'il apprit à jouer sans jouet, sans camarades, et sans connaître les jeux. La mer, l'air gris et l'eau grise, l'air bleu et l'eau bleue, les harles et les macreuses durent satisfaire son besoin de découvrir et de combiner ; quand cela devint insuffisant, son œil puisa dans ses propres ressources pour combler ce manque ; son oreille avide, qui ne connaissait que le rugissement ou le murmure du vent, le clapotis ou le grondement des vagues, se nourrit de sa propre substance, et, exacerbée par cette autarcie, finit par distinguer des sons là où il n'y en avait pas, entendre la circulation du sang, la tension des nerfs, le déchirement des tissus, puis les sons enfin, qui, au fil des mois, se rassemblaient, s'ordonnaient, s'unissaient pour en engendrer d'autres. "

    Alrik Lundstedt ce jeune homme surdoué monte à Stockholm pour apprendre la musique. Mais la " folle du logis " l'entraîne hors du chemin... Rêve et réalité se mêlent...

  • Arvid Falk is a young and idealistic government worker who always wanted to be a poet. When a journalist writes a newspaper exposé based on Arvid's stories about his useless government department, Arvid is fired immediately. Starting afresh he sets out to explore every corner of the Swedish society, and the hypocrisy and corruption he finds shocks him.

    Walking the streets of Stockholm will never be the same again once this novel gets under your skin. Named the first modern Swedish novel, `The Red Room' (1879) is wonderfully insightful and ironic. The Charles Dickens influence is undeniable and Strindberg's writing has been rightfully compared to that of Henrik Ibsen as well.

  • A gripping new version of Strindberg's masterly, darkly hilarious depiction of the struggles and strains of marriage. Meet Edgar and Alice. Married for over thirty years, theirs is a relationship of explosive mutual loathing. Strindberg's tale paints a compulsive and bitterly funny portrait of a magnificently doomed couple, whose ongoing battle threatens not only their future, but that of their friends and children as well. This new version offers audiences a unique chance to see not only Part One but also the rarely performed Part Two of this masterpiece of European theatre condensed into a single two-act drama. 'ferociously intense... a howl of primitive power' The Times 'a blistering account of a mildewed marriage' Whatsonstage.com 'Howard Brenton has worked wonders... this fresh and exciting new version demands to be seen' British Theatre Guide

  • The NHB Drama Classics series presents the world's greatest plays in affordable, highly readable editions for students, actors and theatregoers. The hallmarks of the series are accessible introductions (focussing on the play's theatrical and historical background, together with an author biography, key dates and suggestions for further reading) and the complete text, uncluttered with footnotes. The translations, by leading experts in the field, are accurate and above all actable. The editions of English-language plays include a glossary of unusual words and phrases to aid understanding. Strindberg's Miss Julie is perhaps his most famous play. Bored with her sheltered existence, Miss Julie attempts to seduce the footman, but gets far more than she bargained for. This Drama Classics edition is translated and introduced by Kenneth McLeish, and also includes the author's Preface to the play.

  • Caryl Churchill's spare and resonant version of Strindberg's enigmatic masterpiece. Written in 1901, a mysterious amalgam of Freud, Alice in Wonderland and Strindberg's own private symbolism, A Dream Play follows the logic of a dream: A young woman comes from another world to see if life is really as difficult as people make it out to be. Characters merge into each other, locations change in an instant and a locked door becomes an obsessive recurrent image. As Strindberg wrote in his preface, he wanted 'to imitate the disjointed yet seemingly logical shape of a dream. Everything can happen, everything is possible and probable. Time and place do not exist.' From a literal translation by Charlotte Barslund. Introduction by Caryl Churchill. 'elegant yet funereal and, like dreams, paradoxically serene and fraught'- Independent on Sunday '100 minutes of disconcerting theatrical brilliance... spellbinding'- Daily Telegraph

  • The Father; A Dream Play; Miss Julie; The Ghost Sonata; The Dance of Death

    `Ibsen can sit serenely in his Doll's House,' Sean O'Casey remarked, `while Strindberg is battling with his heaven and his hell.'

    Strindberg was one of the most extreme, and ultimately the most influential theatrical innovators of the late nineteenth century. The five plays translated here are those on which Strindberg's international reputation as a dramatist principally rests and this edition embraces his crucial transition from Naturalism to Modernism, from his two finest achievements as a psychological realist, The Father and Miss Julie, to the three plays in which he redefined the possibilities of European drama
    following his return to the theatre in 1898. Michael Robinson's highly performable translations are based on the authoritative texts of the new edition of Strindberg's collected works in Sweden and include the Preface to Miss Julie, Strindberg's manifesto of theatrical naturalism.

    Introduction Textual Note Bibliography Chronology Explanatory Notes

  • Anglais Julie

    Strindberg August

    In the oppressive heat of Midsummer's Eve, Julie, daughter of the lord, is drawn into a dangerous tryst with her father's butler. As the night wears on, the couple, from opposite ends of the social spectrum, dance, flirt and fight towards an explosive conclusion that will shake the existing order to its core.Zinnie Harris's new version of Strindberg's nineteenth-century masterpiece, Miss Julie, relocates the play to central Scotland between the wars.The play premiered at Platform, Easterhouse, in a National Theatre of Scotland Ensemble production in September 2006.

  • Anglais Creditors

    Strindberg August

    Anxiously awaiting the return of his new wife, Adolph finds solace in the words of a stranger. But comfort soon turns to destruction as old wounds are opened, insecurities are laid bare and former debts are settled.Regarded as Strindberg's most mature work, Creditors is a darkly comic tale of obsession, honour and revenge. David Greig's version premiered at the Donmar Warehouse, London, in September 2008.

  • The Father; A Dream Play; Miss Julie; The Ghost Sonata; The Dance of Death

    `Ibsen can sit serenely in his Doll's House,' Sean O'Casey remarked, `while Strindberg is battling with his heaven and his hell.'

    Strindberg was one of the most extreme, and ultimately the most influential theatrical innovators of the late nineteenth century. The five plays translated here are those on which Strindberg's international reputation as a dramatist principally rests and this edition embraces his crucial transition from Naturalism to Modernism, from his two finest achievements as a psychological realist, The Father and Miss Julie, to the three plays in which he redefined the possibilities of European drama
    following his return to the theatre in 1898. Michael Robinson's highly performable translations are based on the authoritative texts of the new edition of Strindberg's collected works in Sweden and include the Preface to Miss Julie, Strindberg's manifesto of theatrical naturalism.

    Introduction Textual Note Bibliography Chronology Explanatory Notes

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